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So Many Museums, So Little Time

This here hermit is getting ready to travel to Berlin, Germany, where I will mostly be in charge of entertaining myself while Ganesh is busy doing fancy lectures for his job. I have decided to visit as many museums as I can, but in a city where—according to Google—sports over 180 museums and over 300 art galleries, there's really no way I can even scratch the surface in a five-day visit. How do I prioritize?

There is a Bauhaus design museum and a photography museum that are both a must for me, but other than that, it's all up in the air. Oh yeah, and the Pergamom, and maybe the dinosaurs, and maybe the "not for the faint of heart" Topography of Terror, documenting the atrocities of World War II. There are just too many from which to choose.

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